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About Us


The Beautification and Shade Tree Advisory Commission has a primary role in "assisting in improving the overall visual quality of the city. The commission advises the city council on methods and means of enhancing the visual quality of the city." Input from citizens of Pleasant Grove is extremely important in these efforts as well. Pleasant Grove is divided up into eleven neighborhood areas in the city with a Beautification Commission member from each neighborhood. Citizens can

contact their neighborhood commission member or any member if you do not know which neighborhood you're in.

WHAT IS THE BEAUTIFICATION COMMISSION?

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What Have We Done Lately?

The PG Beautification & Shade Tree Commission has been very busy the past few years working on several projects to enhance and beautify our wonderful City. These projects range from planting trees to water conservation, from working on a City tree list to coordinating with the Parks department on park maintenance. Here are some details of our most recent projects.

City Tree Lists

In 2013 the Mayor and the City Council asked the City Beautification Advisory Commission to compile a list of trees that would be a good choice for planting in Pleasant Grove. That list was completed and delivered to city staff members for their approval and revisions, then forwarded to the city council. It is available online as the PG City Tree Guide.

Arbor Day Celebration and Tree Planting

Each year, the PG Beautification & Shade Tree Commission oversees the Annual Arbor Day Celebration. This event occurs the Saturday following Labor Day and consists of an opening ceremony, plantings of trees to improve a City property, and a recognition of PG City's involvement in the Tree City USA program. Each year, a Boy Scout Eagle candidate is identified to organize and coordinate this event with the oversight of the Commission. This event has been a center point for the tree planting efforts of PG City and has enhanced many properties, parks and green space.

Water Conservation Awareness and Education Plan

With our water needs continually increasing and our water resources dwindling, it has become imperative for PG City to do everything possible to conserve our water. To help with this effort, the PG Beautification & Shade Tree Commission has been busy creating a Water Conservation Awareness and Education Plan. In coordination with PG Public Works, the Commission is launching a three pronged approach of education, regulation, and monitoring to help maximize the conservation efforts. This plan consists of many options to help residents, businesses, churches, and schools within the City limits to become involved in helping conserve the precious resources of water. To learn more about this effort, please review our water conservation information.

Strawberry Days Garden Tour

During the 2014 Strawberry Days celebrations, the PG Beautification & Shade Tree Commission held the first ever Strawberry Days Garden Tour. This tour included 11 amazing gardens and yards from within City boundaries being showcased for their beauty, uniqueness, or environmental awareness. This tour became such an instant hit that the Commission will be providing this event each year during our City celebration. If you know a yard that would be a great addition, please feel free to nominate it for the tour.

Yard of The Month and Holiday Lights

Each month of the Summer (June, July, and August), the PG Beautification & Shade Tree Commission searches high and low throughout all eleven neighborhoods looking for amazing yards to showcase for the month. Yards that show amazing beauty, major improvements, or climate friendly plantings are determined. A sign is then put in the yard of choice and remains for the month. At the end of the month, the sign will be moved to the next Yard of the Month and a small gift is shared with the home owners. We highlight these winners each month in the City Newsletter. We are appreciative of all the hard work home owners do to help make our City and neighborhoods beautiful and inviting. You can see some of the previous winners on our Yard of The Month page.

Along with Yard of The Month, the Commission searches for amazing Holiday decoration and light displays in each of our neighborhoods in early December. The displays awarded are those done by the homeowners showing creativity and beauty. The Commission awards a small gift and presents the Winners in the January City Newsletter. You can see some of the previous winners on our Holiday Lights page.

Parks Management Thank You Dinner

Each year, the PG City Beautification & Shade Tree Commission partners with the Parks and Recreation Department on maintenance of the PG City Parks. The Parks department works diligently all summer long to maintain our wonderful parks and green spaces. During those months, the Commission reviews each park regularly and rates the park. At the end of the summer, the ratings are tallied and a winner is chosen. The Commission then hosts a "Thank You" dinner for all Parks personnel and their families to thank them for all their hard work through the summer. The winner is awards a small gift and certificate for their amazing efforts. We are so grateful for a fantastic Parks department and all that they do to make our City a awesome place to enjoy parks and recreation space.

ARE YOU WATER WISE?

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Water is Our Most Precious Natural Resource

In our beautiful Pleasant Grove City, use of our water resources makes our city a beautiful, and inviting place to live, work, and play. The over use of this resource will cause us and our posterity serious problems in the near and far future. We must protect and conserve water whenever and wherever possible.

What Does Being "Water Wise" Mean?

Being "water wise" means conserving water as an individual, family, and community. By doing our part, we can make a big difference for our current and future community.

Why Should I Care?

Our water resource is a precious and limited commodity needed for now and our future.
Small changes in our homes will make a big impact for us all!

How Can I Help?

By reading though the water saving information on this site, as an individual or as a family, and implementing a few water saving techniques, we can each make a difference in our water usage.

Take the Pledge!

Caring About our Water Resources

As you have heard in the news and can see by looking at our mountains, we are facing a very serious water shortfall again this year. This is due to many factors, which we cannot control. But we can control how much water we use. This is where we can all work together to improve our situation and protect our water resources. To help with this, we have provided several resources right here. Please visit this page often to see updates on our water totals and for updated information and resources.

Check out our current mountain water levels http://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/nwcc/view?intervalType=+View+Current+&report=WYGRAPH×eries=Daily&format=plot&sitenum=1039&interval=WATERYEAR
Request a free sprinkler check to help you fine tune your sprinkler system for maximum conservation
See how to conserve water indoors in our indoor conservation section
Check out more ways to conserve water indoors and out at www.slowtheflow.org
Learn ways to improve your yard landscape for conservation in our smart yard section
Check out water wise landscaping techniques at www.centralutahgardens.org
Lawns take a lot of water. See how to improve your lawn with simple low cost solutions
See what the State of Utah is promoting in water conservation at conservewater.utah.gov

WANT TO PLANT A TREE?

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About this Tree Guide

The Pleasant Grove City Council invited its' Beautification Commission to put together a tree guide for trees that will do well in the Pleasant Grove area. We are pleased to introduce this tree guide as a resource for helping citizens of Pleasant Grove select trees that will do well in our area and meet their needs and interests. This tree guide provides useful information about size, relative growth rates, and other features such as water requirements, fall color, edible fruit, and more! The tree guide is categorized by the following:

Boulevard/park strip trees – includes trees that are smaller in size and typically have a narrow or columnar growth habit. These features are important when planting in boulevards or park strips to reduce or eliminate a number of potential problems later as the tree matures. Poor selection of trees for a boulevard or park strip can results in things such as roots lifting sidewalks, branches interfering with driver visibility, branches inferring with power lines, unsightliness, other safety hazards, etc.
Utility trees – includes smaller varieties of trees and includes some of the same trees as identified in the boulevard/park strip classification. The difference between the "utility" and "boulevard/park" strip classifications is this classification will include trees with smaller growth habits, but not necessarily a narrow or columnar growth pattern. Also, this classification includes both *deciduous and **coniferous varieties whereas the boulevard/park strip classification includes deciduous varieties only.
Mid-sized trees – includes trees of both deciduous and coniferous varieties which typically require spacing between mature trees of 20 feet or more.
Large-sized trees – includes trees of both deciduous and coniferous varieties which typically require spacing between mature trees of 35 feet or more.
This publication is to be used as a guide when choosing a tree that will do well in the Pleasant Grove area. This is not an exhaustive list, and there are other trees no found in this guide, that may do well in Pleasant Grove.

Selecting a Tree

To select a tree not listed in this guide, here are some considerations to keep in mind.

Look for trees that will do well in zone 5 or lower. The USDA has created a plant hardiness zone map that is divided into 10 regions that are defined by the average minimum winter temperatures. Our zone is 5b with a minimum temperature of -10° to -15°. Plants that are zoned higher (6-10) can't take temperatures lower than this. That being said, there are microclimates in your neighborhoods and even in your own yard that may not get as cold as a zone 5b. That is why you will see trees for zone 6 surviving here. If you do choose a tree that is zoned higher than a 5b, be prepared that it may not survive one of our extra cold winters.
Look for trees that have a strong branch structure that are not prone to breakage in storms or heavy snow events. You can research whether or not a tree is prone to breakage online, through our local garden nurseries, or a good reference guide such as Dirr's "Manual of Woody Landscape Plants". Some trees that are more prone to breakage are: Flowering Pears, all Willow Trees, Purple Leaf Flowering Plums, Siberian Elms, Trees of Heaven, Cottonwood Trees and any tree with branches that form a sharp V shape at the crotch. The faster a tree grows, the weaker the branches will be. Good pruning practices can help lessen the risk of branch breakage. If you decide to choose a tree that is prone to branch breakage, only plant those varieties where they will not be a liability to people or property.
Know your soils PH. The PH of soils is determined by a soil test. Most soils range between a PH of 5 (very acid) to 8 (very alkaline) with 7 being neutral. Pleasant Grove soils are quite alkaline and generally average between a PH of 6.5 to 8. Plants that need a more acidic soil, such as blueberries, azaleas, white pines, red oaks and certain maples, do not do well here. It is very difficult to change the PH of our soil because the water here is also alkaline. You can try to modify the PH of the soil by regularly adding compost, mulching with acidic mulch, such as pine needles, adding soil sulfur and fertilizing with acidic fertilizer. None of those methods will modify the soil's PH as deep as the trees roots will go and none are permanent fixes. They need to be repeated yearly to be effective for more shallowly rooted plants. You can research the PH needs of a plant through our local nurseries, online, or through good reference manuals.
Know a plants sun, shade, nutrients and water requirements. Each plant has different needs. The sun is harsher in the Rocky Mountain States because of our altitude and lack of humidity. Plants that need full sun generally need to be put in a spot that gets 6 to 8 hours of full sun a day. Some plants that can deal with full sun on the east coast may need more shade in our area. Research the needs of each tree that you would like to plant to make sure you have the right spot for it. If a tree needs part shade, be sure to put it in the shade of another tree or building where it will get some sun during the day. If it needs full sun, be sure to not put it in an area where it will not get the sun it needs. Consider the growth habits of other trees and vegetation nearby that may have an impact on your tree in the future.
Know the disease and insect pests for each tree you would like to plant and make sure that they are not an issue in our area. The local nurseries in our area are a good resource for this kind of research.
Resources for research: USU Tree Browser http://www.treebrowser.org/

USU Extension http://forestry.usu.edu/

Dirr's "Manual of Woody Landscape Plants"

"Sunset Western Garden Book"

Here are some things to consider when choosing a tree at a nursery:

Balled and burlapped trees- Balled and burlapped trees are priced by the width of the trunk about 4.5 feet above the ground. They are generally larger and more mature trees. They are dug out of the ground in the early spring and in the fall while they are dormant. When they are dug out of the ground, the roots are severed and then the root ball is bound in burlap to protect it. The larger the tree was when it was dug out of the ground, the more stunted it will be once it is replanted. Trees up to 2″ of diameter should do fine and will grow well. The diameter of a tree (tree caliper) is measured 4.5 feet up from the ground. The larger diameter trees will be stunted and may never catch up in growth to trees that were a smaller diameter when they were dug out of the ground.
Potted Trees – Potted trees are priced by the size of the pot. They are usually started in a pot and then transplanted to bigger pots as they mature. The biggest issue to watch for with potted trees are circling roots. As the tree matures and grows in its pot, the roots can start to circle the pot. If they circle too much, especially at the top of the root ball, they can eventually strangle the tree and it will die. You can generally see the problem roots, if they exist, in the top few inches of soil.
The larger the tree, the more important it is to choose from a reputable nursery. Smaller box stores can have good prices but the care of the tree while at those stores may not be optimal. Look for trees that have been well cared for while at the store or nursery. Drought or nutrient stressed trees may recover if they are a young tree but will probably struggle once planted if they are more mature.
Planting a Tree
The USU has a good article on planting trees at http://forestry.usu.edu/htm/city-and-town/tree-planting/ten-tree-planting-rules. The following steps were taken from that article.

Choose the right tree for your site using the steps we have outlined in the paragraphs above.
If you need to wait before planting your tree, be sure to keep it shaded and moist. Be very careful not to disturb the root ball by dropping the tree or treating it roughly.guide
Remove all labels, wires or ropes from the trees branches and trunk. You do not want them to girdle (dig into) the tree as it grows.
Dig a hole that is 2 to 3 times the width of the root ball. A balled and burlapped tree should be planted with the root collar just above the level of the soil. Do not bury the top of the root ball. A potted tree should be planted so the soil level in the pot is level with the soil it is planted in and should also not be planted too deeply. Be sure to identify and gently tease out any circling roots. If the circling roots are large and mature, leave them alone.
Balled and burlapped trees need to have as much of the wire and burlap removed as possible. To protect the tree's root ball, place the tree in the hole with all the wire and burlap intact. Backfill just until the tree is stabilized and then remove as much of the wire and burlap as possible without breaking the root ball. It is ok to leave some wire and burlap at the bottom of the hole, it will naturally decompose.
Backfill with native soil. Do not add fertilizer for at least the first year. If you need to backfill with soil amendment use 25% peat or compost to 75% native soil.
Do not cut back the top portion of the tree. You can cut out dead branches, double leaders or branches that are interfering with other branches. Do not prune the tree the first year, and follow proper pruning practices thereafter. Allow some of the lower branches to remain on the tree to strengthen the trunk while it is young. You can slowly remove lower branches to the desired height over the span of 5 years.
Keep a newly planted tree moist for the first few weeks after planting by watering it a couple of times a weeks. Water only when the top couple of inches of the soil are dry. Once established, water deeply and infrequently for the lifetime of the tree.
One of the most important steps is to apply 2″ to 4″ of mulch around the tree up to 3 times the root ball diameter. As the tree grows, increase the circumference of the mulch. Do not pile the mulch around the trunk of the tree as that encourages root rot.
Only wrap a trunk or stake a tree if necessary. The only times you should stake a tree is if it is in an area where there is a lot of wind, or if the crown of the tree is so much larger than the root ball that the tree won't stand up straight on its own. If you need to stake a tree, stake it loosely and only stake it for 1 to 2 years.

Tree Guide List

This tree guide list is broken up into four categorizations including (1) boulevard/park strip trees, (2) utility trees, (3) mid-sized trees, or (4) large-sized trees. Each tree in this tree guide has the following summary list:

Scientific Name – the scientific name is provided
Size – the width and height at maturity is provided
Drought Tolerance – each tree is classified as to how waterwise it is with a designation of high, medium, or low.
Native Plant – each tree has a "yes" or "no" to indicate whether it is a native Utah plant or not.
Fall Color – each tree has description of the typical fall color the tree displays.
Edible Fruit – each tree has a "yes" or "no" to indicate whether it has edible fruit or not.
Growth Rate – each tree has a growth rate designation of "fast, medium, or slow".

WANT TO BE A WINNER?

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As the Pleasant Grove Beatification & Shade Tree Commission continues to look for ways to improve the beauty of our city, we have noticed so many beautiful yards, gardens, and residences. It so impressive how many of our great citizens work hard to keep our city beautiful and clean. We would like to recognize everyone and thank you all for your efforts. To help us do this, we have been awarding "Yard of The Month" and "Holiday Light" awards for several years. See below for details. Maybe we will spot your yard soon!

APPLICATION TO SERVE ON THE COMMISSION



Are you Water Wise


Indoor Water Conservation

Indoor Water Conservation
When talking about water conservation, we can focus so much on yard water usage and forget that we run many, many gallons through each home each day. Small adjustments in how we use water in our homes can result in millions (yes, that is right…millions) of gallons of saved water each year. An average family of four can uses approximately 400 gallons of water per day. We can reduce this and minimize our waste by following a few simple practices. Here is an extensive list of ways your family could reduce water waste indoors. How many gallons can your family save?

KITCHEN

When washing dishes by hand, don’t let the water run. Fill one basin with wash water and the other with rinse water.
Dishwashers typically use less water than washing dishes by hand. Now, Energy Star dishwashers save even more water and energy.
Designate one glass for your drinking water each day, or refill a water bottle. This will cut down on the number of glasses to wash.
Soak pots and pans instead of letting the water run while you scrape them clean.
Use the garbage disposal sparingly. Instead, compost vegetable food waste and save gallons every time.
Wash your fruits and vegetables in a pan of water instead of running water from the tap.
Don’t use running water to thaw food. For water efficiency and food safety, defrost food in the refrigerator.
Install an instant water heater near your kitchen sink so you don’t have to run the water while it heats up. This also reduces energy costs.
Keep a pitcher of drinking water in the refrigerator instead of running the tap. This way, every drop goes down you and not the drain.
Reuse leftover water from cooked or steamed foods to start a nutritious soup, it’s one more way to get eight glasses of water a day.
Cook food in as little water as possible. This also helps it retain more nutrients.
Select the proper pan size for cooking. Large pans may require more cooking water than necessary.
If you accidentally drop ice cubes, don’t throw them in the sink. Drop them in a house plant instead.
Collect the water you use while rinsing fruit and vegetables. Use it to water house plants.
When shopping for a new dishwasher, use the Consortium for Energy Efficiency website to compare water use between models.
LAUNDRY ROOM

When doing laundry, match the water level to the size of the load.
Washing dark clothes in cold water saves water and energy, and helps your clothes retain their color.
When shopping for a new washing machine, compare resource savings among Energy Star models. Some can save up to 20 gallons of water per load.
When buying a washer, check the Consortium for Energy Efficiency website to compare water use between models.
BATHROOM

If your shower fills a one-gallon bucket in less than 20 seconds, replace the showerhead with a WaterSense® labeled model.
Shorten your shower by a minute or two and you’ll save up to 150 gallons per month.
Time your shower to keep it under 5 minutes. You’ll save up to 1,000 gallons per month.
Toilet leaks can be silent! Be sure to test your toilet for leaks at least once a year.
Put food coloring in your toilet tank. If it seeps into the bowl without flushing, there’s a leak. Fix it and start saving gallons.
When running a bath, plug the bathtub before turning on the water. Adjust the temperature as the tub fills.
Upgrade older toilets with water-saving WaterSense® labeled models.
If your toilet flapper doesn’t close properly after flushing, replace it.
Use a WaterSense® labeled showerhead. They’re inexpensive, easy to install, and can save you up to 750 gallons a month.
Turn off the water while you brush your teeth and save up to 4 gallons a minute. That’s up to 200 gallons a week for a family of four.
If your toilet was installed before 1992, purchasing a WaterSense® labeled toilet can reduce the amount of water used for each flush.
Consider buying a dual-flush toilet. It has two flush options: a half-flush for liquid waste and a full-flush for solid waste.
Plug the sink instead of running the water to rinse your razor and save up to 300 gallons a month.
Turn off the water while washing your hair and save up to 150 gallons a month.
When washing your hands, turn the water off while you lather.
Take 5-minute showers instead of baths. A full bathtub requires up to 70 gallons of water.
Install water-saving aerators on all of your faucets.
Drop tissues in the trash instead of flushing them and save water every time.
Look for WaterSense® labeled toilets, sink faucets, urinals and showerheads.
One drip every second adds up to five gallons per day! Check your faucets and showerheads for leaks.
While you wait for hot water, collect the running water and use it to water plants.
GENERAL INDOOR

Teach children to turn off faucets tightly after each use.
Watch the Home Water Challenge video or use the Home Water Audit Calculator to see where you can save water.
When the kids want to cool off, use the sprinkler in an area where your lawn needs it most.
Encourage your school system and local government to develop and promote water conservation among children and adults.
Play fun games while learning how to save water!
Monitor your water bill for unusually high use. Your bill and water meter are tools that can help you discover leaks.
Learn how to use your water meter to check for leaks.
Reward kids for the water-saving tips they follow.
Avoid recreational water toys that require a constant flow of water.
Grab a wrench and fix that leaky faucet. It’s simple, inexpensive, and you can save 140 gallons a week.
Hire a GreenPlumber® to help reduce your water, energy, and chemical use.
Be a leak detective! Check all hoses, connectors, and faucets regularly for leaks.
We’re more likely to notice leaky faucets indoors, but don’t forget to check outdoor faucets, pipes, and hoses.
See a leak you can’t fix? Tell a parent, teacher, employer, or property manager, or call a handyman.
At home or while staying in a hotel, reuse your towels.
Make suggestions to your employer or school about ways to save water and money.
Run your washer and dishwasher only when they are full. You can save up to 1,000 gallons a month.
See how your water use stacks up to others by calculating your daily water use.

Outdoor Water Conservation

Self Water Audit

Take The Pledge!

 

Have You Taken The Pledge?


Even with all the snow, we all still need to conserve water where we can. PG City is launching a Water Conservation Education and Awareness campaign to help us all learn ways to conserve our precious water resources. Check out the Water Wise information and then make sure to Take the Water Wise Pledge!

Get Involved


We are looking for some energetic, motivated folks who love our beautiful City and would love to participate in helping us improve our City. If you would like to be considered for a position on the Beautification and Shade Tree Commission, please submit your application today.

Neighborhood Map

MAP

Contact Us

Contact Us P.G. Beautification & Shade Tree Commission Membership

Neighborhood

Representative

Email Address

Phone Number

BATTLE CREEK Jane & Robert Walter 801-785-1646
BIG SPRINGS Nathan & Janelle Gerber 801-796-6892
GROVE CREEK Mark Bishop 801-634-4307
LITTLE DENMARK Kyle & Carisa Hoopes 801-796-9604
MANILA Dave Bunting 801-785-9210
MONKEY TOWN Mark Nielsen 801-882-3650
MUD HOLE James (JD) Glenn 385-259-8436
NORTH FIELDS Glenna M’Li Hoki 801-368-2846
OLD FORT LaRaine Montgomery 801-785-4523
SCRATCH GRAVEL Kelly Ovard 801-589-3394
STRING TOWN Kathy Watkins
Felicia Auna

801-319-2114
253-886-3174

Get Involved

Serving on the Commission

The PG Beautification and Shade Tree Advisory Commission is looking for volunteers! Members of the Commission are a hard working group which:

  • Advises the City Council on the methods and means of enhancing the beauty of the city
  • Makes recommendations to the City Council for programs such as Arbor Day, cleanup and home beautification contests, etc.
  • Participates in the development of the urban forestry program for the betterment, care and maintenance of city and non-city trees
  • Are appointed by the Mayor with consent of the City Council
  • Have become familiar with Pleasant Grove City Code, Title Two,  Chapter 2, Article E
  • Attends monthly meetings (2nd Thursday of each month)
  • Awards homeowners in each neighborhood (Yard of the Month) June – September
  • Awards homeowners in your neighborhood (Seasonal Decoration) December
  • Helps in organizing and attend the annual Arbor Day Celebration
  • Organizes and participates in the Strawberry Days Hidden Garden Tour
  • Attends City meetings as assigned (City Council, DRC, Planning, etc.)
  • Attend seminars and classes to stay informed of current practices
  • Communicates with the Leisure Services Division (Parks & Cemetery Department) for park improvements
  • Develops and carries out the PG City Water Conservation Awareness and Education Plan
  • Compensation – Members shall serve without monetary compensation

What is expected/required to be on the Commission?

Each Commission member is expected to fulfill the following:

  • Complete the application below and be available for a quick discussion with a Commission member
  • Be presented to the City Council and Mayor for appointment on the Commission
  • Be willing to serve on the commission for a 4 year term
  • Dedicate approximately 1 hour each week on Commission duties
  • Attend the monthly Commission meeting every 2nd Thursday 7:00-8:30pm
  • Have fun working on City beautification projects!
For more information, please refer to Pleasant Grove City Code, Chapter 2, Article E

Application to serve on Commission

Schedule a Water Check

Scheduling Free Water Check

Between our yards and our home life, we use a lot of water. A significant use of water in our neighborhoods is our lawns and gardens. We all enjoy beautiful yards, but we can minimize our water usage while still maintaining that beauty by adjusting and maximizing our sprinkler systems. Remember to always follow the city approved watering days for outside watering. This helps keep our water systems functioning at an acceptable level. Also, check out our section on improving your lawns for tips and tricks on how to increase your lawns water holding capabilities.

The free sprinkler check is done by volunteers who have been trained on how to measure and calculate the best operating time and frequency of each of your lawn sprinkler zones. They will also identify any issues that you may need to have repairs or adjusted to improve efficiency. The check takes about 1 hour (depending on how many zones you have) and will produce a report for you to keep upon completion.

Individual sprinkler checks and group checks can be requested.

Please, contact us today for your Free Sprinkler Check:

Deon Giles

(801) 785-5045

dgiles@pgcity.org" style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; outline: none; color: rgb(159, 159, 159);">dgiles@pgcity.org

Improve Your Lawn

Improving Your Lawn

Our lawns get thirsty during a hot summer day. Unfortunately, our soils don’t naturally allow our lawn roots to penetrate deeply and vigorously, which in turn requires more water to keep them green. Grass type, soil type, slope, and sun exposure all contribute to our lawns getting thirsty. Here are some suggestions to keep your lawns healthy happy while keeping our water usage low:

  • On sloping areas, water each zone for 10 minutes, cycle through all the zones and immediately water each zone for an additional 10 minutes. This will allow the water to penetrate more deeply into the soils.
  • Each spring, rake in a thin layer (approximately ¼ to ½ inch) of fine organic mulch or compost. Water it is evenly and watch your lawn green up quickly. This compost gives a boost of nutrients to your lawn, but also increases the water holding capacity of the soils, especially on sloping areas.
  • Keep your lawn cut at 2 and ½ inches to 3 inches each mowing. Mow every 5-7 days to keep the lawn healthy and happy.
  • Use the recommended fertilizers at the recommended times to keep your lawn from being stressed. A stressed lawn takes more water to keep green. See your local nursery or home improvement store for recommendations.
  • Check brown spots for insects, grubs, or incorrectly adjusted sprinkler heads. If your lawn in browning is spots, grab a hold of the browned area in one hand and slightly tug. If the grass comes right out with no roots, you probably have an insect problem. Check your local nursery, home improvement store or lawn care service to remedy this problem. More water will not fix this!

Create a Smart Yard

Creating a Smart Yard

Is your yard a smart yard?

Similar to the concept of a smart car, a smart yard is designed to maximize the plant life, the soil type, the landscape and the environment to encourage growth, efficiency, and water usage. We are not sure who coined the phrase “smart yard”, but we love the concept. It is all about creating a yard that is in harmony with our native environment including plants, soils, and topography.

We are putting the details together on our “smart yard” plan. You can view our draft Smart Yard Presentation or check out the Tennessee Smart Yard program (on which we are basing our program).

Please check this page often as we are eagerly building our smart yard program and will put it here when it is complete for your reference.

 

Plant a Tree


About This Tree Guide



The Pleasant Grove City Council invited its’ Beautification Commission to put together a tree guide for trees that will do well in the Pleasant Grove area. We are pleased to introduce this tree guide as a resource for helping citizens of Pleasant Grove select trees that will do well in our area and meet their needs and interests. This tree guide provides useful information about size, relative growth rates, and other features such as water requirements, fall color, edible fruit, and more! The tree guide is categorized by the following:

  1. Boulevard/park strip trees – includes trees that are smaller in size and typically have a narrow or columnar growth habit. These features are important when planting in boulevards or park strips to reduce or eliminate a number of potential problems later as the tree matures. Poor selection of trees for a boulevard or park strip can results in things such as roots lifting sidewalks, branches interfering with driver visibility, branches inferring with power lines, unsightliness, other safety hazards, etc.
  2. Utility trees – includes smaller varieties of trees and includes some of the same trees as identified in the boulevard/park strip classification. The difference between the “utility” and “boulevard/park” strip classifications is this classification will include trees with smaller growth habits, but not necessarily a narrow or columnar growth pattern. Also, this classification includes both *deciduous and **coniferous varieties whereas the boulevard/park strip classification includes deciduous varieties only.
  3. Mid-sized trees – includes trees of both deciduous and coniferous varieties which typically require spacing between mature trees of 20 feet or more.
  4. Large-sized trees – includes trees of both deciduous and coniferous varieties which typically require spacing between mature trees of 35 feet or more.
This publication is to be used as a guide when choosing a tree that will do well in the Pleasant Grove area. This is not an exhaustive list, and there are other trees no found in this guide, that may do well in Pleasant Grove.

Selecting a Tree

To select a tree not listed in this guide, here are some considerations to keep in mind.

  • Look for trees that will do well in zone 5 or lower. The USDA has created a plant hardiness zone map that is divided into 10 regions that are defined by the average minimum winter temperatures. Our zone is 5b with a minimum temperature of -10° to -15°. Plants that are zoned higher (6-10) can’t take temperatures lower than this. That being said, there are microclimates in your neighborhoods and even in your own yard that may not get as cold as a zone 5b. That is why you will see trees for zone 6 surviving here. If you do choose a tree that is zoned higher than a 5b, be prepared that it may not survive one of our extra cold winters.
  • Look for trees that have a strong branch structure that are not prone to breakage in storms or heavy snow events. You can research whether or not a tree is prone to breakage online, through our local garden nurseries, or a good reference guide such as Dirr’s “Manual of Woody Landscape Plants”. Some trees that are more prone to breakage are: Flowering Pears, all Willow Trees, Purple Leaf Flowering Plums, Siberian Elms, Trees of Heaven, Cottonwood Trees and any tree with branches that form a sharp V shape at the crotch. The faster a tree grows, the weaker the branches will be. Good pruning practices can help lessen the risk of branch breakage. If you decide to choose a tree that is prone to branch breakage, only plant those varieties where they will not be a liability to people or property.
  • Know your soils PH. The PH of soils is determined by a soil test. Most soils range between a PH of 5 (very acid) to 8 (very alkaline) with 7 being neutral. Pleasant Grove soils are quite alkaline and generally average between a PH of 6.5 to 8. Plants that need a more acidic soil, such as blueberries, azaleas, white pines, red oaks and certain maples, do not do well here. It is very difficult to change the PH of our soil because the water here is also alkaline. You can try to modify the PH of the soil by regularly adding compost, mulching with acidic mulch, such as pine needles, adding soil sulfur and fertilizing with acidic fertilizer. None of those methods will modify the soil’s PH as deep as the trees roots will go and none are permanent fixes. They need to be repeated yearly to be effective for more shallowly rooted plants. You can research the PH needs of a plant through our local nurseries, online, or through good reference manuals.
  • Know a plants sun, shade, nutrients and water requirements. Each plant has different needs. The sun is harsher in the Rocky Mountain States because of our altitude and lack of humidity. Plants that need full sun generally need to be put in a spot that gets 6 to 8 hours of full sun a day. Some plants that can deal with full sun on the east coast may need more shade in our area. Research the needs of each tree that you would like to plant to make sure you have the right spot for it. If a tree needs part shade, be sure to put it in the shade of another tree or building where it will get some sun during the day. If it needs full sun, be sure to not put it in an area where it will not get the sun it needs. Consider the growth habits of other trees and vegetation nearby that may have an impact on your tree in the future.
  • Know the disease and insect pests for each tree you would like to plant and make sure that they are not an issue in our area. The local nurseries in our area are a good resource for this kind of research.
Resources for research: USU Tree Browser http://www.treebrowser.org/

USU Extension http://forestry.usu.edu/

Dirr’s “Manual of Woody Landscape Plants”

“Sunset Western Garden Book”

Here are some things to consider when choosing a tree at a nursery:

  • Balled and burlapped trees- Balled and burlapped trees are priced by the width of the trunk about 4.5 feet above the ground. They are generally larger and more mature trees. They are dug out of the ground in the early spring and in the fall while they are dormant. When they are dug out of the ground, the roots are severed and then the root ball is bound in burlap to protect it. The larger the tree was when it was dug out of the ground, the more stunted it will be once it is replanted. Trees up to 2″ of diameter should do fine and will grow well. The diameter of a tree (tree caliper) is measured 4.5 feet up from the ground. The larger diameter trees will be stunted and may never catch up in growth to trees that were a smaller diameter when they were dug out of the ground.
  • Potted Trees – Potted trees are priced by the size of the pot. They are usually started in a pot and then transplanted to bigger pots as they mature. The biggest issue to watch for with potted trees are circling roots. As the tree matures and grows in its pot, the roots can start to circle the pot. If they circle too much, especially at the top of the root ball, they can eventually strangle the tree and it will die. You can generally see the problem roots, if they exist, in the top few inches of soil.
  • The larger the tree, the more important it is to choose from a reputable nursery. Smaller box stores can have good prices but the care of the tree while at those stores may not be optimal. Look for trees that have been well cared for while at the store or nursery. Drought or nutrient stressed trees may recover if they are a young tree but will probably struggle once planted if they are more mature.

Planting a Tree

The USU has a good article on planting trees at http://forestry.usu.edu/htm/city-and-town/tree-planting/ten-tree-planting-rules. The following steps were taken from that article.

  1. Choose the right tree for your site using the steps we have outlined  the paragraphs above.
  2. If you need to wait before planting your tree, be sure to keep it shaded and moist. Be very careful not to disturb the root ball by dropping the tree or treating it roughly.https://web.archive.org/web/20170703071118im_/http://beautiful.plgrove.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/guide-150x150.jpg 150w, https://web.archive.org/web/20170703071118im_/http://beautiful.plgrove.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/guide.jpg 400w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" style="margin: 0.857143rem 0px 0.857143rem 1.71429rem; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; height: auto; max-width: 100%; float: right; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2) 0px 1px 4px;">
  3. Remove all labels, wires or ropes from the trees branches and trunk. You do not want them to girdle (dig into) the tree as it grows.
  4. Dig a hole that is 2 to 3 times the width of the root ball. A balled and burlapped tree should be planted with the root collar just above the level of the soil. Do not bury the top of the root ball. A potted tree should be planted so the soil level in the pot is level with the soil it is planted in and should also not be planted too deeply. Be sure to identify and gently tease out any circling roots. If the circling roots are large and mature, leave them alone.
  5. Balled and burlapped trees need to have as much of the wire and burlap removed as possible. To protect the tree’s root ball, place the tree in the hole with all the wire and burlap intact. Backfill just until the tree is stabilized and then remove as much of the wire and burlap as possible without breaking the root ball. It is ok to leave some wire and burlap at the bottom of the hole, it will naturally decompose.
  6. Backfill with native soil. Do not add fertilizer for at least the first year. If you need to backfill with soil amendment use 25% peat or compost to 75% native soil.
  7. Do not cut back the top portion of the tree. You can cut out dead branches, double leaders or branches that are interfering with other branches. Do not prune the tree the first year, and follow proper pruning practices thereafter. Allow some of the lower branches to remain on the tree to strengthen the trunk while it is young. You can slowly remove lower branches to the desired height over the span of 5 years.
  8. Keep a newly planted tree moist for the first few weeks after planting by watering it a couple of times a weeks. Water only when the top couple of inches of the soil are dry. Once established, water deeply and infrequently for the lifetime of the tree.
  9. One of the most important steps is to apply 2″ to 4″ of mulch around the tree up to 3 times the root ball diameter. As the tree grows, increase the circumference of the mulch. Do not pile the mulch around the trunk of the tree as that encourages root rot.
  10. Only wrap a trunk or stake a tree if necessary. The only times you should stake a tree is if it is in an area where there is a lot of wind, or if the crown of the tree is so much larger than the root ball that the tree won’t stand up straight on its own. If you need to stake a tree, stake it loosely and only stake it for 1 to 2 years.

Tree Guide List

This tree guide list is broken up into four categorizations including (1) boulevard/park strip trees, (2) utility trees, (3) mid-sized trees, or (4) large-sized trees. Each tree in this tree guide has the following summary list:

    • Scientific Name – the scientific name is provided
    • Size – the width and height at maturity is provided
    • Drought Tolerance – each tree is classified as to how waterwise it is with a designation of high, medium, or low.
    • Native Plant – each tree has a “yes” or “no” to indicate whether it is a native Utah plant or not.
    • Fall Color – each tree has description of the typical fall color the tree displays.
    • Edible Fruit – each tree has a “yes” or “no” to indicate whether it has edible fruit or not.
    • Growth Rate – each tree has a growth rate designation of “fast, medium, or slow”.

Boulevard Tree List

Boulevard Tree List – No More than 15′ Wide



Columnar Hornbeam:
Scientific Name: Carpinus betula ‘Fastigata’
Size: 35′ X 15′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Golden Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Columnar Hornbeam is a little more narrow than the common European variety. It starts branching at the base. It has a very formal appearance and does not require very much pruning. The golden fall color is spectacular.

http://www.robertsonlandscaping.com







Columnar Sergeant Cherry:
Scientific Name: Prunus sargentii ‘Columnaris’
Size: 35′ X 15′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow and Orange Red
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Columnar Sergeant Cherry has an upright, narrow, growth habit. It has beautiful, white spring flowers.

http://www.projectnoah.org







Dawyck Purple Beech:
Scientific Name: Fagus sylvatica ‘Dawyck Purple’
Size:30′ X 12′
Drought Tolerance: Low
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Reddish Bronze
Edible Fruit: Yes
Growth Rate: Average



Comments: The Dawyck Purple Beech is a very narrow tree with an upright habit. It branches from the base and has beautiful, purple leaf color. This tree needs moisture, but can’t tolerate soil that stays too wet or is compacted.

http://nursery.artknappsurrey.com







Lavelle Hawthorn:
Scientific Name: Crataegus lavallei ‘Lavalle Hawthorn’
Size: 28′ X 20′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Coppery red
Edible Fruit: Fruit is edible, seeds are poisonous
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: It is a shorter tree, so may block some views. The spring flowers are white and it does form fruit on the ends of the branches. The leaves are small and leathery and the bark is a lighter color. It is a hardy, beautiful tree that can stand many diverse conditions.

images/beautification/







Flowering Pear:
Scientific Name: Pyrus calleryana ‘Capital’, ‘Cleveland Select’
Size: 40′ X 15′:
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Orange-red
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Fast to Moderate



Comments: This is the only pear I would consider for a boulevard tree. It is a little more disease resistant, and has stronger branches. The white flowers in the spring are beautiful but odiferous, and the fall color is spectacular.

http://www.thetreefarm.com/pear-chanticleer-flowering







Mushashino Columnar Zelkova:
Scientific Name: Zelkova serrata ‘Mushashino Columnar Zelkova’
Size: 45′ X 15′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Purple-Red
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: Zelkova trees are beautiful, disease-resistant trees with great fall color. Watch for weak, narrow branches while the tree is young, in this variety, to avoid breakage during storms. This is a very hardy and narrow tree.

http://grobenursery.com/newest_trees







Crimson Century Maple:
Scientific Name: Acer platanoides ‘Crimson Sentry’
Size: 25′ X 15′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Reddish-Purple
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Crimson Century Maple is a very narrow maple tree with great color. It can tolerate a wide variety of conditions but the trunk needs to be wrapped for protection from sun scald in the winter while the tree is young.

http://www.steinbrinklandscaping.com/proddetail.php?prod=trees-00012







Princeton Sentry Ginko:
Scientific Name: Ginko biloba ‘Princeton Sentry’
Size: 40′ X 15′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Bright Yellow
Edible Fruit: Female trees have edible but stinky fruit
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: This variety of Ginko is highly recommended as a street tree. It is a very hardy and narrow tree.

http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/uf/uts/section1/sect1-slide74.htm







Columnar Norway Maple
Scientific Name: Acer platanoides ‘Columnare’
Size: 35′ X 15′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Bright Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: Columnar Norway Maples are narrow, hardy trees. They have a yellow fall color. The trunks need protection from sun scald in the winter by wrapping them while they are young.

http://www.breezyhillnursery.com/plantcatalog.html







Amanogawa Flowering Cherry
Scientific Name: Prunus serrulata ‘Amanogawa’
Size: 20′ X 6′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Orange-Red
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Amanogawa Flowering Cherry is also known as the flagpole cherry because it is so narrow. It has beautiful spring flowers and great fall color

http://www.landscapedesign.co.nz/landscapedetails_miniex.asp?id=3341
http://www.about-garden.com/se/en/fotoa-prunus+serrulata/



Large Sized Trees

Large Sized Trees – (Spacing of 35 feet +)



Lacebark Elm:
Scientific Name: Ulmus parvifolia
Size: 50′ X 35′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderately fast



Comments: The Lacebark Elm is a gorgeous tree with mottled bark. It is very tough and is adapted to our harsh conditions. It should not be confused with its cousin the Siberian Elm. It is a fast grower so the branches tend to be weak and prone to breakage.

http://lh2treeid.blogspot.com







European Larch:
Scientific Name: Larix decidua
Size: 80′ X 35′
Drought Tolerance: Low
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The European Larch tree is an interesting tree that turns brilliant yellow in the fall, then loses its leaves in the winter. It needs moist, well-drained soil to thrive.

http://www.buckeyegardening.com







Kentucky Coffee Tree:
Scientific Name: Gymnocladis dioicus
Size: 50′ X 35′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Kentucky Coffee Tree is a beautiful tree that is disease and insect resistant. It is another tree well-adapted to our conditions. The large seed pods, found on the female tree, can be messy.

http://commons.wikimedia.org







Honey Locust:
Scientific Name: Gleditsia tricanthos inermis ‘Shademaster’, ‘Skyline’, ‘Imperial’
Size: 45′ X 35′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Fast



Comments: The Honey Locust Tree is an overused but beautiful tree which is tolerant of many conditions. It is a fast growing tree that gives a light, dappled shade.

http://www.gardengatetrees.com







Common Hackberry:
Scientific Name: Celtis occidentalis
Size: 40′ X 35′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: Yes, some varieties
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: Yes
Growth Rate: Moderately Fast



Comments: The Common Hackberry is tolerant of wind, alkaline soil, salt and air pollution. The berries attract birds and the bark adds winter interest.

http://www.millettegardenpictures.com







Sycamore Maple:
Scientific Name: Acer pseudoplatanus
Size: 45′ X 35′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Brown to None
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderately Fast



Comments: The Sycamore Maple is tolerant of a wide variety of conditions including saline soils. It will struggle if the soil is not well drained. The seed pods turn red in the fall.

http://www.treebrowser.org







Tulip Poplar:
Scientific Name: Liriodendron tulipifera
Size: 60′ X 35′
Drought Tolerance: Low
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Bright Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Tulip Poplar is a very large tree with beautiful yellow flowers in the summer. It prefers deep, moist soil. It is not tolerant of very wet or very dry soils. It is worth trying because of its unique leaves and beautiful flowers.

http://www-pub.naz.edu







Bur Oak:
Scientific Name: Quercus macrocarpa
Size: 60′ X 50′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellowish-Brown
Edible Fruit: Ground acorns produce edible flour if the tannins are leached out with water
Growth Rate: Slow



Comments: The Bur Oak is a very large, beautiful oak tree. It has winged bark on its branches. Children love to collect and play with the acorns because of the fuzzy projections on the caps. This tree has deep roots that make it a better tree for lawns than most. It is highly drought tolerant and is well adapted to our conditions.

http://thegrove.americangrove.org







American Linden:
Scientific Name: Tilia americana
Size: 50′ X 30′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Bright Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The American Linden has larger leaves and is a bigger tree than any of the other Lindens. It is mostly tolerant to our conditions but is susceptible to several diseases. It is not tolerant of saline or heavy, wet soils.

http://www.kramertree.com







Horsechestnut:
Scientific Name: Aesculus hippocastanum
Size: 60′ X 50′
Drought Tolerance: Low
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellowish-Brown
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The horsechestnut has some of the most beautiful flowers found on any tree in our area. They are large and are either pink or white. It is a large tree that needs moist conditions, but does not tolerate heavy, wet soils. It is adapted to our alkaline soils.

http://ferrebeekeeper.wordpress.com
http://davesgarden.com







London Plane:
Scientific Name: Platanus acerifolia
Size: 80′ X 50′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The London Plane tree is well adapted to our harsh conditions. It has lovely, green, mottled bark. It is related to the Sycamore tree and is distinguishable from it by the bark being green rather than tan. It is too large for most small properties. They are related to the Sycamore Tree and is susceptible to anthracnose. Trees that are infected with anthracnose will defoliate in the summer but will quickly re-grow the lost leaves. Yearly spraying in the spring may be necessary to protect the tree.

http://kootation.com
http://www.jeanneloveall.com







Sycamore:
Scientific Name: Platanus occidentalis
Size: 80′ X 50′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Sycamore tree is a very large, adaptable tree. It is too large for small properties and does tend to lift sidewalks and cause problems by lifting the asphalt in the streets. It is better when planted on large properties or in parks. Sycamore Trees are susceptible to anthracnose. Trees that are infected with anthracnose will defoliate in the summer but will quickly re-grow the lost leaves. Yearly spraying in the spring may be necessary to protect the tree.

http://www.morgantownwv.gov
http://www.etsu.edu







Ohio Buckeye:
Scientific Name: Aesculus glabra
Size: 40′ X 30′
Drought Tolerance: Low
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow and Orange
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Ohio Buckeye tree is related to the horsechestnut but is a smaller tree that has smaller leaves. It prefers some shade while it is younger to prevent leaf scorch in the summer. It needs to be planted in moist, well-drained soils.

http://www.yvts.com







Bald Cypress:
Scientific Name: Taxodium distichum
Size: 60′ X 45′
Drought Tolerance: Low
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Orange-Brown
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Fast



Comments: The Bald Cypress is a good tree for consistently moist areas. The roots develop buttresses so the tree can survive oxygen poor soils. It can be planted around ponds and in wetland areas. It can also tolerate drier conditions and needs a soil ph that is not too alkaline. It is a beautiful, large conifer that loses its needles during the winter. BYU has nice specimens surrounding the duck pond.

http://treetour.byu.edu







Ginko:
Scientific Name: Ginko biloba
Size: 70′ X 30′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Bright Yellow
Edible Fruit: Female trees will produce edible but stinky fruits
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Ginko tree has no known pests or diseases and is very adaptable to our area. Plant the male variety to avoid messy fruit drop. The leaves have a beautiful, gold fall color and the nuts of the female tree are edible but have a foul odor.

http://www.myfrenchforest.blogspot.com







Zelkova:
Scientific Name: Zelkova Serrata
Size: 50′ X 30′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Orange, Bronze, Red
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



http://oregonstate.edu
http://www.wilsonnurseries.com



Mid Sized Trees – (Spacing of 20 to 30 feet)

Mid Sized Trees – (Spacing of 20 to 30 feet)



Scientific Name: Fraxinus americana ‘Autumn Purple’
Size: 35′ X 30′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Deep Reddish Purple
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderately Fast



Comments: The Autumn Purple Ash is a moderately drought tolerant tree that can withstand the alkalinity of our soils. The fall color is a beautiful orange/purple. Watch for sun scald on the trunk in young trees and wrap them in the winter if they start to develop problems with splitting bark.

http://www.lizer.net







Austrian Pine:
Scientific Name: Pinus Nigra
Size: 60′ X 30′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Green
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Austrian Pine is a large, hardy, drought-tolerant pine tree. It is one of the most adapted pine trees for our area.

http://www.cabincreeknursery.com







Mountain Ash:
Scientific Name: Sorbus aucuparia
Size: 35′ X 24′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Reddish-Purple
Edible Fruit: The fruit is edible but bitter
Growth Rate: Moderately Slow



Comments: The Mountain Ash is a very drought tolerant tree with beautiful white flowers, great fall color and red fruit. It is subject to many diseases and pests including borers and fire blight.

http://www.plantetorvet.dk







Norway Maple:
Scientific Name: Acer platanoides
Size: 40′ X 30′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Norway Maple is a dense tree with a round head that casts deep shade. It is adapted to our harsh conditions, has great fall and summer color and is easy to grow. It does tend to be over planted in Utah despite problems with aphids and sunscald on the trunk. Seedlings can become invasive in lawns.

http://plants.bachmanslandscaping.com
http://www.studebakernurseries.com







Norway Spruce:
Scientific Name: Picea abies
Size: 40′ X 30′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Green
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderately Fast



Comments: The Norway Spruce is larger tree that is drought tolerant and is well-adapted to our area. Deer do like to browse the growth tips of this tree in the spring.

http://www.extension.iastate.edu







Pyramidal Hornbeam:
Scientific Name: Carpinus betula ‘Fastigiata’
Size: 40′ X 30′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Bright Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: Pyramidal Hornbeams are hardy trees with a very formal appearance. They are moderately drought tolerant, and adapted to our harsh conditions. They have fabulous gold fall color.

http://www.pracbrown.co.uk







Tricolor Beech:
Scientific Name: Fagus sylvatica ‘RoseoMarginata’
Size: 30′ X 20′
Drought Tolerance: Poor
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Copper
Edible Fruit: Yes
Growth Rate: Slow



Comments: Tricolor Beech trees are fantastically beautiful trees that needs to be planted in an area protected from the sun. The multicolor leaves scald easily. These trees are not drought tolerant and do need slightly acidic soil for better leaf color.

http://plants.schaefergreenhouses.com







Little Leaf Linden:
Scientific Name: Tilia cordata ‘Greenspire’
Size: 40′ X 30′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Bright Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Little Leaf Linden is an over planted tree in our area. It is not drought tolerant but is very hardy in Utah conditions. It has a nice pyramidal shape and highly fragrant flowers in the summer. The seeds can be messy.

http://www.readscreeknursery.com







Paper Birch:
Scientific Name: Betula papyrifera
Size: 35′ X 30′
Drought Tolerance: Poor
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderately Fast



Comments: The Paper Birch tree has beautiful white, exfoliating bark and nice golden fall color. It needs a lot of moisture to look good. It is tolerant of our alkaline soil and is very salt tolerant.

http://www.treebrowser.org







Eastern Red Cedar:
Scientific Name: Juniperus virginiana
Size: 50′ X 25′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Green
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Eastern Red Cedar is very drought tolerant and hardy in our area. It is a great tree to plant in tough conditions. Deer do tend to browse this tree when the winters are harsh.

http://www.abnativeplants.com







European White Birch:
Scientific Name: Betula Pendula
Size: 35′ X 25′
Drought Tolerance: Poor
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Fast



Comments: The European White Birch is a beautiful tree with white bark and a weeping habit. It needs more moisture than most trees but is hardy in our area. It tends to be affected by borer when stressed. Keeping the tree in moist, cooler conditions helps it avoid stress.

http://www.lowes.com







Flowering Pear
Scientific Name: Pyrus calleryana ‘Aristocrat’
Size: 36′ X 25′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Purplish-Red
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Fast



Comments: This flowering pear’s branches are more broadly spaced than others so it is more able to withstand wind and snow without breakage. It has beautiful but mal odorous spring flowers







Flowering Pear:
Scientific Name: Pyrus calleryana ‘Redspire’
Drought Tolerance: Average
Size: 30′ X 25′
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Purplish-Red
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Fast



Comments: The leaves on this pear tree are reddish in the spring and it has beautiful but mal odorous spring flowers. The fall color is spectacular. This tree is fast growing and the branches are prone to breakage.

http://www.winterhill.com.au







Mimosa:
Scientific Name: Albizia julibrissin
Size: 35′ X 30
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: None
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Fast



Comments: Mimosa trees are very pretty trees with fragrant, pink blooms that bloom all summer. They are marginally hardy in our area (zone 6) but there are several beautiful specimens in Pleasant Grove so they are worth trying. They have average drought tolerance but do not suffer damage from many pests. They do tend to suffer winter dieback especially in colder areas. The flowers continue throughout the summer and attract hummingbirds.

http://www.florum.fr







Bakari Blue Spruce:
Scientific Name: Picea pungens ‘Bakari’
Size: 35′ X 20′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Blue
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Bakari Blue Spruce is a smaller blue spruce with very blue foliage. It has moderate drought tolerance and does not suffer from many pests as long as it gets enough water.

http://www.pottersnurseries.com







Columnar Atlas Cedar:
Scientific Name: Cedrus atlantica ‘Glauca Fastigiata’
Size: 30′ X 25′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Green
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Slow



Comments: The Columnar Atlas Cedar is a slow growing tree that is quite beautiful. It does need good drainage and protection from harsh winters to do well.

http://newplants.tripod.com







Bosnian Pine:
Scientific Name: Pinus leucodermis
Size: 35′ X 15′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Green
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Slow



Comments: The Bosnian Pine is a slow growing, narrow pine tree that is well adapted to our area. It is quite drought tolerant and very beautiful. It has few pests.

http://newplants.tripod.com







Golden Rain Tree:
Scientific Name: Koelreutaria paniculata
Size: 30′ X 30′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Golden Rain Tree has very beautiful yellow flowers and unusual seed pods shaped like lanterns that can be messy in the fall. They are very drought and salt tolerant and do well in our area. One issue with Golden Rain Trees is weak branch patterns that make them susceptible to breakage in storms.

http://tree-species.blogspot.com







Canadian Red Chokecherry:
Scientific Name: Prunus virginiana
Size: 30′ X 20′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Purple
Edible Fruit: Yes
Growth Rate: Fast



Comments: This tree starts out green in the spring and changes to purple in the summer. The white flowers are very fragrant. It does have a habit of suckering extensively but can be grown as a single trunk tree with effort, or a multi trunk shrub. This tree grows well in areas that receive average water and have good drainage. The fruit is edible but is very astringent. The berries make wonderful jams or fruit leather. Eating them straight from the tree is not pleasant.

Http://oregonstate.edu







River Birch:
Scientific Name: Betula nigra
Size: 35′ X 20′
Drought Tolerance: Poor
Native Plant: Yes
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Fast



Comments: The River Birch is a beautiful multi-trunked tree with reddish bark. It does best in areas with a lot of moisture and lower PH, but will survive in areas with less moisture and moderate alkalinity.

http://facultystaff.richmond.edu







Japanese Tree Lilac:
Scientific Name: Syringa reticulata
Size: 25′ X 20′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: None
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Japanese Tree Lilac is a beautiful, small, hardy tree. It has white flowers in the spring and glossy foliage. It is tolerant of salt and alkalinity. It does well in our area.







Incense Cedar:
Scientific Name: Calocedrus decurrens
Size: 80′ X 12′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Green
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Slow



Comments: The Incense Cedar is a beautiful, narrow tree. It is slow growing and shade tolerant. It is very drought tolerant once it gets established. The scaly leaves are very aromatic. There is a beautiful specimen growing by the BYU duck pond.

http://www.treebrowser.org
http://www.plantdex.com



Utility Trees

Utility Trees – (Will grow no more than 25ft tall)



Amanogawa Flowering Cherry
Scientific Name: Prunus serrulata ‘Amanogawa’
Size: 20′ X 6′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Orange-Red
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Amanogawa Flowering Cherry is also known as the flagpole cherry because it is so narrow. It has beautiful spring flowers and great fall color

http://www.landscapedesign.co.nz/landscapedetails_miniex.asp?id=3341
http://www.about-garden.com/se/en/fotoa-prunus+serrulata/







Amur Maackia:
Scientific Name: Maackia amurense
Size: 20′ X 25′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Red
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Slow



Comments: The Amur Mackia is a little known tree here in Utah. It is a very slow growing but beautiful tree. It has white flowers in the summer when few other trees are in bloom and small brown seed pods in the autumn. It will tolerate the toughest conditions, including our alkaline soils. An added benefit is that the roots will fix nitrogen in the soil like legumes.

http://www.cirrusimage.com/tree_Amur_maackia.htm
http://www.deeproot.co.uk







Autumn Brilliance Serviceberry:
Scientific Name: Ameianchier X grandiflora
Size: 20′ X 15′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: Yes
Fall Color: Orange-Red
Edible Fruit: Yes
Growth Rate: Slow



Comments: The Autumn Brilliance Serviceberry is a tree that is native to Utah. It is shrub that has beautiful white flowers in the spring, fantastic fall color and edible fruit. It is very drought tolerant and does very well in our soils.

http://www.urbanforestnursery.com







Baby Blue Eyes Blue Spruce:
Scientific Name: Picea pungens ‘Baby Blue Eyes’
Size: 20′ X 10′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Blue
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Slow



Comments: As with most conifers, the branches on the Baby Blue Eyes Spruce need to start at ground level. This helps protect the trunk from sun scald. It is a tough, narrow, drought tolerant tree. This tree is prone to blowing over in wind storms if it is put in the lawn and watered shallowly and often, and not allowed to grow deep roots. It is not salt tolerant.

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/272339/







Big Toothed Maple:
Scientific Name: Acer grandidentatum
Size: 20′ X 20′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: Yes
Fall Color: Orange-Red
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Big Tooth Maple has the best color of our Utah native trees. It is very drought tolerant and does very well in our area.

http://lovecreeknursery.com







Camperdown Elm:
Scientific Name: Ulmus glabra ‘Camperdownii’
Size: 20′ X 18
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderately Fast



Comments: The Camperdown Elm is a gorgeous, weeping tree. It is susceptible to Dutch Elm Disease, but is otherwise hardy. It needs moderate watering in the summer.

http://scottishartistandhisgarden.blogspot.com







Crabapple:
Scientific Name: Malus floribunda
Size: 15′ X 20′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: Yes
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: There are many colors and varieties of crabapple. Look for persistent fruit to avoid the mess of fallen fruit. These trees are tolerant of many different soil conditions.

http://donnan.com







Crabapple, Prairiefire:
Scientific Name: Malus sp ‘Prairiefire’
Size: 15′ X 15′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: no
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The fruit of the Prairiefire Crabapple is persistent which means the fruit hangs on the tree until the birds eat it or it shrivels and falls off. It does not cause a mess. It has the darkest pink flower color of all the crabapples.

http://justtwofarmkids.com







Crabapple , Sargentina:
Scientific Name: Malus ‘Sargentina’
Size: 6′ X 6′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: Yes
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: This is one of the smallest crabapples. It has beautiful white flowers in the spring and persistent fruit.

http://buddelandscaping.com







Crimson Century Maple:
Scientific Name: Acer platanoides ‘Crimson Sentry’
Size: 25′ X 15′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Purple
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderately Fast



Comments: The Crimson Century Maple is a very narrow maple tree with great color in the summer. It can tolerate a wide variety of conditions but the trunk needs to be wrapped for protection from sun scald in the winter while the tree is young.

http://www.steinbrinklandscaping.com/proddetail.php?prod=trees-00012







Curl Leaf Mountain Mahogany:
Scientific Name: Cercocarpus ledifolius
Size: 15′ X15′
Drought Tolerance: Very High
Native Plant: Yes
Fall Color: Green
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Slow



Comments: This is a small, evergreen tree or shrub that is native to our mountains. Once established it does not need additional water. It has narrow waxy leaves and insignificant flowers.

http://treebrowser.org
http://www.plantperfect.com







Eastern Redbud:
Scientific Name: Cercis canadensis
Size: 20′ X 15′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: Redbud trees have beautiful spring flowers. They do need shelter from full sun while they get established. Shade from larger trees would be the best. A beautiful cultivar is Forest Pansy which has purple leaves in the spring.

http://beechwoodlandscape.blogspot.com







Gamble Oak:
Scientific Name: Quercus gambelii
Size: 20′ X 20′
Drought Tolerance: Very High
Native Plant: Yes
Fall Color: Orange and Yellow
Edible Fruit: Acorns can be ground into edible flour if tannins are leached out in water
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: This is a native oak tree or shrub that is very drought tolerant once established. It naturally forms small thickets but can be grown as a small tree with some maintenance.

http://healthyhomegardening.com







Kwanzan Cherry:
Scientific Name: Prunus serrulata ‘Kwanzan’
Size: 25′ X 25′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Kwanzan Cherry tree has very large, double, pink blooms in the spring. It is a shorter tree with a broad head.

http://kieferlandscaping.com







Lavelle Hawthorn:
Scientific Name: Crataegus × lavallei ‘Lavelle Hawthorn’
Size: 15′ X 15′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Coppery red
Edible Fruit: Fruit is edible, seeds are poisonous
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Lavelle Hawthorn is a very attractive, hardy tree. It has white flowers in the spring and red fruit in the fall. The only drawback is the thorns.

http://urbanforestnursery.com







Lavender Twist Redbud:
Scientific Name: Cercis canadensis ‘Covey’
Size: 8′ X 6′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Lavender Twist Redbud is a beautiful little weeping tree. It does need protection from hot drying winds and needs adequate moisture with soil that drains well.

http://flickr.com







Little Leaf Linden (Summer Sprite):
Scientific Name: Tilia cordata ‘Halka’
Size: 16′ X 10
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Bright Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: Summer Sprite is a nice dwarf cultivar of Linden Trees. Like all Linden Trees this tree is sensitive to depth of planting. Do not plant it too deep or the roots will suffocate. It has beautiful flowers, with a delightful fragrance, that bloom in early summer

http://bathgardencenter.com







Oregon Green Austrian Pine:
Scientific Name: Pinus nigra ‘Oregon Green’
Size: 25′ X 15′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Green
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Slow



Comments: This cultivar of Austrian Pines is a new cultivar of an old favorite. It stays very short and compact and is hardy for our area.

http://northernchristmastrees.com







Paperbark Maple:
Scientific Name: Acer griseum
Size: 25′ X 20′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Scarlet Red
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Slow



Comments: The Paperbark Maple tree has very beautiful, exfoliating bark. It is tolerant of alkaline soils and cold winters.

http://www.treetopics.com/acer_griseum/index.htm
http://www.jfschmidt.com/catalogphotos/0607BR/index.html







Smoke Tree:
Scientific Name: Cotinus coggygria
Size: 20′ X 20′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Orange-Red
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Smoke tree is actually a large shrub. It is very tough and can be pruned into a many trunked tree. The flowers form a smoky looking haze over the purple canopy. There is a cultivar with leaves that have a yellow tinge.

http://ces.ncsu.edu







Snow Fountains Weeping Cherry:
Scientific Name: Prunus X snofazom
Size: 12′ X 12′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Orange-Burgandy
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Snow Fountains Cherry is a small, beautiful, weeping cherry tree that has white flowers in the spring.

http://monrovia.com







Tartarian Maple, Hot Wings:
Scientific Name: Acer Tataricum ‘GarAnn’
Size: 20′ X 20′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Scarlet
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Tartarian Maple is a beautiful little shrub or tree that has red seed pods. It is more adapted to the alkaline soil of our area so it has less problems with iron deficiency than the Amur Maple. It has nice fall color.

http://wyomingplantcompany.com







Thornless Cockspur Hawthorn:
Scientific Name: Crateagus crus-galli var. inermis
Size: 20′ X 20′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Orange-Red
Edible Fruit: Yes but the seeds are poisonous
Growth Rate: Slow



Comments: The Thornless Cockspur Hawthorn is a very beautiful, thornless Hawthorne tree. It has small leathery leaves and white flowers.

http://atozlandscapinginc.com/Bachmans/noprice/item/472393.htm







Utah Juniper:
Scientific Name: Juniperus osteosperma
Size: 15′ X 10′
Drought Tolerance: Very high
Native Plant: Yes
Fall Color: Green
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Utah juniper is another drought tolerant, Utah native. It is a smaller shrub that can take tough conditions.

http://scienceviews.com







Vanderwolf’s Pyramid Limber Pine:
Scientific Name: Pinus flexilis ‘Vanderwolf’s Pyramid’
Size: 20′ X 15′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Green
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Vanderwolf Pine tree is a small, very beautiful pine tree with flexible, elegant branches. It is more tolerant of our alkaline soils than other white pines because it is grafted on a root stock that is adapted to our soils.

http://fallerlandscape.com







Weeping Siberian Peashrub:
Scientific Name: Caragana arborescens ‘Pendula’
Size: 15′ X 10′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Bright Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Weeping Siberian Pea Shrub is drought tolerant and tough. It has thorns and yellow flowers in the spring.

http://www.dammanns.com/?p=2592







Western Redbud:
Scientific Name: Cercis occidentalis
Size: 20′ X 20′
Drought Tolerance: Average
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Bright Yellow
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: The Western Redbud is tolerant of full sun and alkaline soils. It has beautiful purple flowers that appear before the heart shaped leaves in the spring. It is hardy to zone 6, although there are Western Redbuds that have thrived in zones 5b. The young trees do need to be protected from temperatures below 20° but the older trees are hardy to well below 10°

http://ebay.com.au
http://snwa.com







Zelkova-City Sprite:
Scientific Name: Zelkova serrulata ‘JFS-KW1′
Size: 24′ X 18′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Reddish-Orange, Purple
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Moderate



Comments: Zelkova trees are beautiful disease resistant trees with great fall color. This is a small, very hardy tree.

http://plantilus.com







Zelkova-Wireless:
Scientific Name: Zelkova serrulata ‘Schmidtlow’
Size: 24′ X 36′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: No
Fall Color: Reddish-Orange, Purple
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Slow



Comments: This Zelkova cultivar is low and spreading with gorgeous fall color. It is very hardy and disease resistant.

http://www.jfschmidt.com/introductions/wireless/index.html







Pinon Pine:
Scientific Name: Pinus edulis
Size: 15′ X 15′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: Yes
Fall Color: Green
Edible Fruit: Yes
Growth Rate: Slow



Comments: The Pinyon Pine tree is famous for the tasty pine nuts that can be gathered from this tree. It is a very drought hardy, tough and adaptable tree. It is worth planting in our area.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org







Bristlecone Pine:
Scientific Name: Pinus longaeva
Size: 15′ X 15′
Drought Tolerance: High
Native Plant: Yes
Fall Color: Green
Edible Fruit: No
Growth Rate: Slow



Comments: This tree is a beautiful tree that is easily identifiable by the small white resin flecks on the needles. Each cluster of needles contains 5 needles. It is an exceptionally hardy tree and it is very drought tolerant and is native to our mountains. The only thing it cannot handle is heavy, wet soils. Some of the oldest living trees in the world are bristlecone pines.

http://www.studyblue.com



 

Be a Winner


Yard of the month

Every year during the months of June, July and August, your Pleasant Grove Beautification Commission members go out to each of our 11 neighborhoods looking for the "Yard of the Month"! The winning yards are based on several criteria. We look for a yard that is well maintained by homeowners who take pride in not only their yard, but also want their neighborhood to look good as well. We also look for a yard that may be considering ways to help conserve water. To recognize the wonderful yard and those who worked so hard to create it, we place a sign in their yard and award them a small gift. We also announce the winners in the following month's PG City newsletter and on the PG City website.

Holiday Lights

As a Beautification Commission we love how festive Pleasant Grove looks during the holiday season and want to acknowledge all the efforts that are made by our citizens! During the first week of Dec., the Commission members go through each of our 11 neighborhoods [ looking for a festive house that deserves special recognition for the decorations, lights a festive nature. Our winning home is given a small gift and is mentioned in our January newsletter and on the PG City website.

Previous Winners

Previous Winners (past two years)
Yard of The Month

2014
Jerry and Anita Phillips
Danielle and Steven Davis
Russ and Angie Hiatt
Vicky Smith
Michelle Wimmer
Shawn and Connie Faux
Donna Jolley
Joyce Anderson
Danny and Kristina Caldwell
Sterling and Diane Brereton
Dallin Beck
John and Linda Cunico
Josh and Hayley Holliman
Carl and June Warnick
David and Carole Probst
John and Natalie Monson
Lynn and Linda Walker
Natalie and Mark Nielsen
Gary and Kathy Caletti
Chad and Kristie Nielson
Samantha Pontious
Bonnie and Jim Page
Scott & Jennifer Gordon
Dave & Shawna Farnsworth
Paul and Marilyn Maxfield
Mr & Mrs (Phil+Cheree) Phillips
Ned and LaRaine Montgomery
Don and Kathy Gover
Gwen Johnson
Kerry and Joy Edwards
Gary and Karma Fryer
Colleen Gardner
Scott and Annette Anderson
2013
John Lehi and Lila Jensen
Guy and Vicki Dorius
Mark and Sherise Crosby
Linda Sue Smith
Lynde and Randy Mott
Alan and Dixie Young
Bert and Margaret Lagerstedt
Layne and Sherri Atwood
Hank and Virginia Steenhoek
Kyle and Carisa Hoopes
Alan and Cathy Grace
Rex and Dixie Barrington
Brad and Kim Slater
Clark & Julene Heringer
Greg and Chelsea Roper
Dave and Angie Niacaris
LaVern Walker
Bill and Judy Warburton
Mike and Don Deeson
Navin and Lily Naidu
Clint and Laura Chamberlain
Chad and Pam Blackhurst
No Name per request
Lane and Coni Manwill
Jess and Ann Wagstaff
Jackson and Hailey Jones
Paul and LeeAnn Schoonover
Andy and Natalie Weight
Ryan & Cyd LeMone
Janis Peterson
Brent and Connie Davis
Monica & Mark Richards
Gary and Kathy Watkins
2012
Duane and Laura Wardle
Michael and Karen Ferre
Kevin and Angie Wallace
Glen and Kaye Hunsaker
John and Marvann Lewis
Richard & Jean Watts
Steve and Jill Jaynes
Kathryn & Howard Little
Rhonda and Tom Paul
Paul Smith
Kevin & Robin White
Brandon and Helaine Belliston
Mike and Jennifer Bascom
Jim and Denise Taylor
Helen Lindstrom
Kyle and Julie Gutke
Leroy and Glenda Carter
Carol Ann Henrichsen
Judy Thomas
Don and JoAnn Benson

Holiday Lights

2013
Mike and Lori GilbertGary and Karen WilsonVal and Jody KagiePaul and Sherie RitchieNatalie and Mark NielsenShawn CookSpencer and Jocelyn StevensMatthew and Ruth ForteKim and Marla FramptonMax and Maxine Garrett
2012
Scott and Karen HormanNorma Jean and Vance HillmanJoe and Becky WalkerDean JensenClegg FamilyLynn and Linda WalkerDustin and Kristi HardyGuy and Paula FugalFreeman AndersenMorris and Karen BlalockMax and Maxine Garrett







Nomination Form

[No form id or name provided!]